Tuesday, 21 March 2017

NILUS AND THE PROTOCOLS.

(Catholic News Service.)

PARIS.—The story of Nilus and "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" of which he is the reputed author, is exciting much attention in Paris, particularly since the Russian paper, the "Posleidnier Novoeit" ("Latest-News"), Paul Milinkoff's organ, has published a series of articles dealing with the Protocols by a Don Cossack, one Mr. du Chayla.  Du Chayla says that he first met Nilus in the library of an Orthodox monastery in Russia; that he is a sincere man, though somewhat credulous and a trifle fanatical.  According to Nilus himself he received the manuscript of the Protocols from Gen. Ratchkosky, by means of a certain woman, Natalie Anastasia K ——. There is also a certain Marshal Soukhotin mentioned, whom Du Chayla is inclined to think serves as a blind to hide the identity of the mysterious Natalie. Anyway, Gen. Ratchkosky was Chief of the Russian Secret Police for a score or more of years. According to Du Chayla he was on the lookout for some imaginative and mystically-minded person who, close to the person of the late Czar, could combat the influence of a person who is known as "Lois Philippe, the mesmerist."  Nilus appears to have fulfilled the General's requirements, particularly as he had made himself notorious by prophesying the approach of Antichrist. Nilus was thus employed to write his book of "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion," a book which accuses the Zionists of a conspiracy to obtain world domination, and the information supplied to him was stated to have been filched from the archives of the Grand Orient in Paris. This is how Du Chayla makes out the case for Nilus, who, he says, is disowned by the Orthodox clergy of Russia, who are not particularly convinced by his mesmerists, his Illuminati, his veiled women, and secret police officials. He throws cold water on the Zionist contention that Nilus, the reputed author of the "Protocols," is a fictitious person who never had any real existence. "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" has been published in almost every modern European language. Its authenticity has been disputed by numerous Zionist scholars and writers, who pronounce the work to be a sheer fake.

Southern Cross (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1954), Friday 9 September 1921, page 6

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